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Product Review: Mira Dynamics Cupping Therapy

Cupping Therapy Do’s and Don’ts
There are many uses for Cupping Therapy and we learn everyday on how we can educate you to live a healthy and happy lifestyle. A lot of the uses on Cupping Therapy are easy-to-apply benefits/remedies that can be used in the comfort of your home by following guidelines. These general uses include therapy/ treatments for headaches & migraines, cellulite reduction, improve digestive function, improve blood circulation, more energy flow, pain relief, stress removal, muscle spasms and more. We cover every section as thoroughly as possible and if you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact us.

For more severe conditions and their treatments we would always recommend to seek advise from a Professional Therapist or Doctor FIRST (Toxin retention, Rheumatism, Infertility, Sports Therapy, Insomnia, Fibromyalgia, Sciatica and more). It is best that a Therapist apply these kind of treatments to ensure that these treatments are effective as possible.

With no further ado, here are the Do’s and Don’ts when it comes to Cupping Therapy (please revert back frequently as we will keep updating this section)…

dos

Do’s
donts

Do:
1. Use circular, zig/zag, up/down motions

Don’t:
1. Do not rush the application process or treatment

Do:
2. Target persistent problem areas for 5 to 8 minutes

Don’t:
2. Do not leave cup stationery for longer than 8 minutes. When leaving the cup stationery, after 2 minutes bruising will occur. This is NORMAL. Please see warning at the bottom of this page.

Do:
3. Always start treatment with the softer (green) cup

Don’t:
3. This is not a must, but you would want to make your skin gradually used to the treatment

Do:
4. For home benefits and treatments like headaches & migraines, cellulite reduction, improve digestive function, improve blood circulation, more energy flow, pain relief, stress removal, muscle spasms, varicose veins: ALWAYS FOLLOW GUIDELINES. See the How to Use section.

Don’t:
4. For severe conditions like Infertility, Fluid and Toxin retention, Rheumatism, Fibromyalgia, Sciatica: Do not use treatment without consulting with a Professional Therapist or Doctor.

Do:
5. Always use some kind of lubricant (water/oil) that compliments the desired treatment. For example: if you want to treat migraine, use an oil that contains mainly Eucalyptus and Lavender essential oils (along with the guidelines on where to place the cups).

Don’t:
5. Do not over-lubricate the area of treatment, as the cup will not be manageable and easily slip from your hands.

WARNING:
The main side effects from cupping therapy are its marks, swelling and bruising along the back. These marks should fade after a few hours, although they may take longer. Aside, there are no known severe side effects that are associated with cupping. Some people who have their first cupping therapy may feel some discomfort as they become used to the sucking pressure of the cups.

Cupping is an ancient Chinese practice that has grown increasingly popular in the west. While its medical benefits are not yet proven, many find cupping deeply relaxing, and find that it stimulates blood flow and good energy. Cupping operates on the same principles as qi (chi) and acupuncture, which has a number of scientific studies to support certain health benefits, such as easing headaches, stress, anxiety, allergies, fatigue, asthma, digestion problems, skin conditions such as eczema, and psoriasis, and others.

History of Cupping Therapy
The history of Cupping Therapy developed over time from the original use of the hollowed animal horns to drain toxins out of snakebites and skin lesions. Horns evolved into bamboo cups, which were eventually replaced by glass. Therapeutic applications evolved with the refinement of the cup itself, and with the cultures that employed cupping as a health care technique. The true origin of cupping therapy remains in obscurity.

The Chinese expanded the utilization to include use in surgery to divert blood flow from the surgery site. Cupping eventually developed into a separate therapy, with healers treating a variety of conditions. Early written records date from 28 AD, and a traditional Chinese saying indicated “acupuncture and cupping, more than half the ills cured”. Chinese medicine observes that cupping dispels stagnation of Blood and Chi, along with external pathogenic factors that invade a weakened constitution. A depleted constitution is often a result of depleted “Jing Chi” or original essence. This will usually progress to a weakened “Wei Chi”, or defense (immune system).

The Egyptians produced a text on ancient medicine that discussed the use of cupping for conditions such as fever, pain, vertigo, menstruation imbalances, weakened appetite and accelerating the “healing crisis” of disease. From the Egyptians, cupping was introduced to the Greeks and eventually spread to ancient cultures in many countries of Europe and even the Americas.

In recent history, European and American doctors widely used cupping in practice into the 1800′s. Research papers were written in the 19th century, and a collaborative effort between the former Soviet Union and China confirmed the clinical efficacy of cupping therapy. It became an official therapy to be found in all Chinese hospitals.

Breast cupping became common for inflamed breasts and lactation dysfunctions and the familiar breast pump evolved from this use. The 20th century brought about a decline in interest as new technology, drugs, and machines came into use. New cupping sets were introduced using mechanical pumps to create the vacuum, and these sets were carried by medical supply companies well into the 1940′s.
-mira-dynamics.com

I always wanted to try this! But didn’t want to try the heated glass method! Enter Mira Dynamics!

All tests were done at the beginner 5 minute mark.

/home/wpcom/public_html/wp-content/blogs.dir/2d2/20990882/files/2015/01/img_4502.jpg

/home/wpcom/public_html/wp-content/blogs.dir/2d2/20990882/files/2015/01/img_4501.jpg

/home/wpcom/public_html/wp-content/blogs.dir/2d2/20990882/files/2015/01/img_4503.jpg quad above knee above and mid back below

/home/wpcom/public_html/wp-content/blogs.dir/2d2/20990882/files/2015/01/img_4505.jpg
I did all around my surgically repaired shoulder and no effect was seen at all except the round suction ring that faded fast. I also did my knee with little to no effect. The knee above is my wife’s and the mid back is mine.

Nothing is like the extreme stagnant results such as the picture (that’s what I was expecting to see, but was disappointed lol). I wonder how long the pictures subject applied the cups for?

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5 responses

  1. Tried this long ago. Never worked for me, but one of my girlfriends from high school…her father loved using the cups on his injured back. Said it worked :/
    ~~~F

    January 5, 2015 at 12:15 AM

    • Awesome, i found so far that it works better on your back. What you are supposed to do according to the company is have someone apply massage oil and then suction it on and then pull up on it a little and slide it around the area that you applied the oil for a kind of anti-massage instead of kneading the muscle you are pulling it up and away from the body. However; the ancient way was to just leave them in one area as they needed to be heated to apply.

      I am glad it worked for your friends father and did you try it as suggested above? If not and you have someone to help; try it again and see if it helps.

      January 5, 2015 at 3:46 AM

      • We have tried it the first way. Not the ancient way. It never worked. Have you done historical research on this technique? I didn’t realize there were ancient ways LoL. I’m an archivist, so history goes hand in hand with what I do professionally. Maybe I’ll research this?!
        ~~~F

        January 6, 2015 at 11:34 PM

      • Oh and we used a candle and glass cup. Waited for the flame to go out and suction to start, then moved the cup around. It never left marks like those though. That’s some hella strong suction.

        January 6, 2015 at 11:38 PM

      • The bruise comes from leaving it stationary for 2+ minutes. You can leabe it from 5-8 minutes, but do not exceed 8

        January 7, 2015 at 12:48 PM

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