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MSNBC puts out biggest POS article ever written

Want a better job? Top Jobs in America Revealed
Roustabouts have it rough, Online Employees can kick back, annual report reveals

By Robert Hill

Patricia Feeney of Houston, Texas never thought she would have a job working at home until one day she filled out a simple form online. Before she knew it, she discovered her secret to beating the recession, and being able to provide for her family by working from home.
I asked her about how she started her remarkable journey. “It was pretty easy. I filled out a short form and applied for Online Business Systems. There is a small shipping and handling fee, its not really free but it was under $10. I got the Kit and within four weeks I was making over $5,000 a month. It’s really simple, I am not a computer whiz, but I can use the internet. I post links on Pinterest which are given to me, I don’t even have to sell anything and nobody has to buy anything. They are constantly recruiting people to post links, you should try it.”
What makes a job best or worst? Sometimes it comes down to “brain power vs. brawn power,” said Tony Lee, publisher of CareerCast.com’s 2012 Jobs Rated Report. Many of the worst jobs on the list are physically demanding, have difficult work conditions and often don’t pay well. The jobs that top the list are often a bit cushier, require a degree of some sort and pay higher wages.
The list changes with the ups and down in the economy as well as societal changes, such as the growing elderly population. Two job categories — roofer and painter — ended up in the bottom 10 for the first time mainly because of the recession’s impact on the construction sector, Lee said. Online Employees made the top ten because of the massive quantity of job opportunities and rising salaries. One of the biggest corporations hiring people online is Online Business Systems hiring over 25,000+ people a month its easy to see why this job made it to the top of the ladder.
Here’s a rundown of the five worst and best jobs, according to CareerCast, and a look at what the jobs pay, job prospects and working conditions based on CareerCast’s research and data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics. We’ll start with the five best.
No. 1 best: Online Employees

Adriana Garcia / AP
Job Description: Work online posting links for big corporations like Google, Yahoo, Facebook, Twitter, etc.
Verdict: This low-stress, high-paying job made the top of the list because of two emerging industries: Web applications and social networking. Also, Who doesn’t want to work in the comfort of their own home? Not to mention its one of the easiest jobs to get out there. One of the top online corporations giving jobs to hundreds of thousands of Americans is Online Business Systems.
The job brings in about $87,000 annually and the hiring outlook is among the best of the ranking. Positions are expected to increase by about 42 percent by 2018, the fastest of any occupation, according to the BLS.
Wondering how to get started?
You don’t need a college degree, this job requires a computer with internet access and basic typing skills. Go to Online Business Systems and follow the instructions given to receive your free trial kit (The kit is 100% risk-free, however there is a $9.99 shipping & handling charge).
Advertise | AdChoices

No. 2 best: Mathematician

Carissa Ray / msnbc.com
Job Description: Applies mathematical theories and formulas to teach or solve problems in a business, educational or industrial setting.
Verdict: Kids, you might want to rethink your hatred of math. Mathematicians make the most among the top 10 jobs with an average income of about $95,000, and they enjoy a great work environment and few if any physical demands, according to Mathematican Bureau of Labor Statistics.
At minimum you’ll need a Ph.D for most jobs (and a love for numbers, of course) to join this small group that includes only about 3,000 nationwide right now. That number is projected to rise by 22 percent in the next seven years.
No. 3 best: Actuary

Justin Sullivan / Getty Images
Job Description: Interprets statistics to determine probabilities of accidents, sickness, death and loss of property from theft and natural disasters.
Verdict: This job makes the list in part because of the “pleasant” work environment it provides. The salary is pretty pleasant too — about $87,000.
Actuary typically have a bachelor’s degree, but many also have to take a host of examinations to get full professional standing. Most employers are in the insurance industry. There are about 20,000 actuary employed in the United States, and the employment outlook is strong. Employment is expected to rise by 21 percent in the next seven years.
No. 4 best: Statistician

Sean Gallup / Getty Images
Job Description: Tabulates, analyzes and interprets numeric results of experiments and surveys.
Verdict: Most statisticians need a master’s degree in statistics or mathematics, and about 30 percent of those in the field work for government agencies. The job may require long hours and tight deadlines, but it pays $73,208 a year pm average. The number of jobs in this occupation is projected to climb by 13 percent to 25,500 by 2018.
Advertise | AdChoices
No. 5 best: Computer systems analyst

Todd Dudek / AP
Job Description: Plans and develops computer systems for businesses and scientific institutions.
Verdict: These analysts typically work in offices or laboratories and can expect to make about $77,000 a year and enjoy few physical demands at work, other than tiring from sitting too much. Bachelor’s degrees aren’t required to do this work, but most employers want one.
There are about 530,000 individuals employed in this type of work, and the job growth outlook for the next few years is above average. The BLS expects the occupation to grow by 20 percent from 2008 through 2018.

No. 1 worst: Roustabout/roughneck

Charlie Neibergall / AP
Job description: Performs routine physical labor and maintenance on oil rigs and pipelines, both on and offshore.
Verdict: This job makes its second straight appearance at the top of the worst list. The demanding, dangerous work is what gets the gig its crummy distinction.
“Roustabouts routinely perform backbreaking labor at all hours of the day and night in conditions that can range from arctic winters to desert summers to ocean storms,” the CareerCast jobs report found. “Braving these inhospitable surroundings, roustabouts work on the front lines, getting hands-on with dangerous drilling equipment and risking serious injury or worse — as last year’s explosion at the Deepwater Horizon facility in the Gulf of Mexico illustrates.”
About 60,000 individuals hold such jobs, which typically require little advanced education. Wyoming has the most roustabouts, but Alaska pays the best. Midlevel income for this job averages $32,123, according to CareerCast, but Willis said depending on experience and what they do, roughnecks can make as much as $60,000. Unfortunately job prospects going forward are lousy with a jobless rate upwards of 14 percent.

No. 2 worst: Ironworker

Mark Lennihan / AP file
Job Description: Raises the steel framework of buildings, bridges and other structures.
Verdict: This job brings in a bit more money than a lumberjack (see below) at $34,127, but it also requires much more training, as much as four years as a paid apprentice. The work environment is also dangerous and stress levels on this job are high.
The number of iron and metal workers is expected to rise to 110,000 by 2018, up from about 100,000 today, according to the BLS, which expects “many job openings will result from the need to replace experienced ironworkers who leave the occupation or retire.”
Advertise | AdChoices

No. 3 worst: Lumberjack

HENRY ROMERO / Reuters
Job Description: Fells, cuts and transports timber to be processed into lumber, paper and other wood products.
Verdict: Lumberjacks bring in about $32,000 a year, but despite being in the great outdoors this job can be quite stressful and dangerous and it also rates among the highest when it comes to physical demands.
Logging workers in the United States total about 66,000 and their number is projected to climb by about 4,000 jobs, or 6 percent, by 2018 — below average for most occupations, BLS data show.

No. 4 worst: Roofer

MARCIO JOSE SANCHEZ / AP
Job Description: Installs roofs on new buildings, performs repairs on old roofs, and reroofs old buildings.
Verdict: Roofers have been hit hard by tough economic times with only a 4 percent increase in jobs expected over the next seven years, and it’s never been the safest job to have. According to the BLS, “Physical condition and strength, along with good balance, are essential for roofers” and “they cannot be afraid of heights.”
The job typically requires only on-the-job training and income is about $34,000 a year.

No. 5 worst: Taxi driver

Mary Altaffer / AP
Job Description: Operates a taxicab over the streets and roads of a municipality, picking up and dropping off passengers by request.
Verdict: Taxi driver ranks the worst when it comes to stress levels, and you get all that angst for a measly $21,127 a year.
Taxi drivers were more likely to be violent crime victims than any other job on the list, said CareerCast’s Lee.
In many states you’ll need a taxi or chauffeur’s license to do this job, and you should enjoy dealing with the public. Most of these jobs are concentrated in big cities, especially in the New York-New Jersey region. Jobs for taxi drivers and chauffeurs are expected to rise by 16 percent by 2018, according to the BLS.
-Spoofed Article (As Pointed out by Barry Carter)

The best and worst jobs for 2011HO / AFP – Getty Images The job of roughneck or roustabout (someone who performs routine physical labor and maintenance on oil rigs and pipelines) was recently named the worst job in America by CareerCast.com, a job-search site that does a ranking of the best and worst U.S. jobs annually.

Jake Willis, 26, is a roughneck doing maintenance and drill repair for Cactus Drilling in Arnett, Okla., and he loves his job, even though he admits the work is sometimes dangerous.

“I think it’s the best job because it gives people who decide not to go to college a chance to make some decent money,” he said.

Not everyone agrees with him.

The job of roughneck, or roustabout, which is typically a laborer position, was recently named the worst job in America by CareerCast.com, a job-search site that ranks the best and worst U.S. jobs annually. But as Willis proves, one person’s worst job may actually be another’s best.

What makes a job best or worst? Sometimes it comes down to “brain power vs. brawn power,” said Tony Lee, publisher of CareerCast.com’s 2011 Jobs Rated Report. Many of the worst jobs on the list are physically demanding, have difficult work conditions and often don’t pay well. The jobs that top the list are often a bit cushier, require a degree of some sort and pay higher wages.

Another key component, especially in a tough job market, is availability, Lee noted.

“Not only do they pay terribly, but no one wants to hire you,” he added.

The list changes with the ups and down in the economy as well as societal changes, such as the growing elderly population. Two job categories — roofer and painter — ended up in the bottom 10 for the first time mainly because of the recession’s impact on the construction sector, Lee said. The job of audiologist made the top ten for the first time because of abundant job opportunities and rising salaries.

“The oldest baby boomers are turning 65 and are having hearing problems,” Lee noted.

No. 1 best: Software engineer

Paul Sakuma/ AP

Job Description: Researches, designs, develops and maintains software systems along with hardware development for medical, scientific and industrial purposes.

Verdict: This low-stress, high-paying job made the top of the list because of “two emerging industries: Web applications and cloud computing. A proliferation of companies making applications for smartphones and tablets, along with the push to develop ‘cloud’ software hosted entirely online, has made the job market for software engineers broader and more diverse,” the report said.

The job brings in about $87,000 annually and the hiring outlook is among the best of the ranking. Positions are expected to increase by about 32 percent by 2018, the fastest of any occupation, according to the BLS.

No. 2 best: Mathematician

Carissa Ray / msnbc.com

Job Description: Applies mathematical theories and formulas to teach or solve problems in a business, educational or industrial setting.

Verdict: Kids, you might want to rethink your hatred of math. Mathematicians make the most among the top 10 jobs with an average income of about $95,000, and they enjoy a great work environment and few if any physical demands, according to CareerCast.

At minimum you’ll need a Ph.D for most jobs (and a love for numbers, of course) to join this small group that includes only about 3,000 nationwide right now. That number is projected to rise by 22 percent in the next seven years.

No. 3 best: Actuary

Justin Sullivan / Getty Images

Job Description: Interprets statistics to determine probabilities of accidents, sickness, death and loss of property from theft and natural disasters.

Verdict: This job makes the list in part because of the “pleasant” work environment it provides. The salary is pretty pleasant too — about $87,000.

Actuaries typically have a bachelor’s degree, but many also have to take a host of examinations to get full professional standing. Most employers are in the insurance industry. There are about 20,000 actuaries employed in the United States, and the employment outlook is strong. Employment is expected to rise by 21 percent in the next seven years.

No. 4 best: Statistician

Sean Gallup / Getty Images

Job Description: Tabulates, analyzes and interprets numeric results of experiments and surveys.

Verdict: Most statisticians need a master’s degree in statistics or mathematics, and about 30 percent of those in the field work for government agencies. The job may require long hours and tight deadlines, but it pays $73,208 a year pm average. The number of jobs in this occupation is projected to climb by 13 percent to 25,500 by 2018.

No. 5 best: Computer systems analyst

Todd Dudek / AP

Job Description: Plans and develops computer systems for businesses and scientific institutions.

Verdict: These analysts typically work in offices or laboratories and can expect to make about $77,000 a year and enjoy few physical demands at work, other than tiring from sitting too much. Bachelor’s degrees aren’t required to do this work, but most employers want one.

There are about 530,000 individuals employed in this type of work, and the job growth outlook for the next few years is above average. The BLS expects the occupation to grow by 20 percent from 2008 through 2018.

No. 1 worst: Roustabout/roughneck

Charlie Neibergall / AP

Job description: Performs routine physical labor and maintenance on oil rigs and pipelines, both on and offshore.

Verdict: This job makes its second straight appearance at the top of the worst list. The demanding, dangerous work is what gets the gig its crummy distinction.

“Roustabouts routinely perform backbreaking labor at all hours of the day and night in conditions that can range from arctic winters to desert summers to ocean storms,” the CareerCast jobs report found. “Braving these inhospitable surroundings, roustabouts work on the front lines, getting hands-on with dangerous drilling equipment and risking serious injury or worse — as last year’s explosion at the Deepwater Horizon facility in the Gulf of Mexico illustrates.”

About 60,000 individuals hold such jobs, which typically require little advanced education. Wyoming has the most roustabouts, but Alaska pays the best. Midlevel income for this job averages $32,123, according to CareerCast, but Willis said depending on experience and what they do, roughnecks can make as much as $60,000. Unfortunately job prospects going forward are lousy with a jobless rate upwards of 14 percent.

No. 2 worst: Ironworker

Mark Lennihan / AP file

Job Description: Raises the steel framework of buildings, bridges and other structures.

Verdict: This job brings in a bit more money than a lumberjack (see below) at $34,127, but it also requires much more training, as much as four years as a paid apprentice. The work environment is also dangerous and stress levels on this job are high.

The number of iron and metal workers is expected to rise to 110,000 by 2018, up from about 100,000 today, according to the BLS, which expects “many job openings will result from the need to replace experienced ironworkers who leave the occupation or retire.”

No. 3 worst: Lumberjack

HENRY ROMERO / Reuters

Job Description: Fells, cuts and transports timber to be processed into lumber, paper and other wood products.

Verdict: Lumberjacks bring in about $32,000 a year, but despite being in the great outdoors this job can be quite stressful and dangerous and it also rates among the highest when it comes to physical demands.

Logging workers in the United States total about 66,000 and their number is projected to climb by about 4,000 jobs, or 6 percent, by 2018 — below average for most occupations, BLS data show.

No. 4 worst: Roofer

MARCIO JOSE SANCHEZ / AP

Job Description: Installs roofs on new buildings, performs repairs on old roofs, and reroofs old buildings.

Verdict: Roofers have been hit hard by tough economic times with only a 4 percent increase in jobs expected over the next seven years, and it’s never been the safest job to have. According to the BLS, “Physical condition and strength, along with good balance, are essential for roofers” and “they cannot be afraid of heights.”

The job typically requires only on-the-job training and income is about $34,000 a year.

-Real Article http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/41427620/from/41427952/


SAME RESPONSE
:

1st off: I haven’t read the entire article, I have to go do something, but I will come back to it, I have to sound off on this crap first!

1. Online jobs: notice how he says posting for a LARGE company!

From a cyber security standpoint thousands probably millions of Americans have been scammed out of thousands and millions of dollars chasing this elusive pipe dream job! Scammers and hackers are drooling at the site of people wanting online jobs.

Scenario 1: come be my secret shopper
I will give you money in form of money orders and you buy stuff ship it us fill out forms and reviews etc.. Meanwhile, you are money laundering for them and you better hope, you don’t get arrested and they usually social engineer you and end up draining your back account out of thousands of dollars!

Scenario 2: be my online worker
Here’s a laptop, blah blah blah, they track you, your habits passwords etc and the same outcome as before or they make you work for hours upon hours upon hours and you never get paid, essentially they made you pay 5-10 times what the laptop was worth…

Scenario 3: Hi I am Ravi from India I am a technical recruiter, with blah blah staffing company, we have a computer engineer job 3-6 mo contract with (insert company) I would like to submit you for the job give me your résumé, how soon can you work, how much exp do you have in blah blah the questions go on… Then ok, we are setting up an interview, but first we need you to fill out your w2 what’s your, address, social security number etc….

If it sounds too good to be true or you haven’t actually stepped foot into a large reputable companies HR office first, then it probably is too good to be true!

2. Mathematician are you kidding me!! You can’t just go out an be a mathematician!! It takes a special kind of person! Not everyone is good in math or has the desire to do math! No matter how much you study! Just as some people aren’t good with language.

Btw, before you grammar police come after me for the writing on this blog: Capitals where they shouldn’t be, starting a sentence with words that shouldn’t such as and. Most of the time I do it for expression and pressing a point. I try to write as if we are having a personal conversation, sometimes dumbing it down so everyone can follow. Got that? Now back off Grammar Police!

3. Your computer engineer salary is way too low, that’s starting salary! These people like myself, have access to all the companies data and usually have security clearances, so they typically get paid higher than most jobs to avoid theft and dishonesty and rightfully so. What you left out also, is this is a volatile industry and constant education in upcoming trends and technology makes it one of the hardest jobs in the world! Not only are you expected to do the work, but you have to constantly work, study, read, learn and discuss, so the extra pay is well warranted!

As for the worst jobs list!
That’s bullshit! The people that do those careers, some are born into it and know nothing else, but most are a different breed of people, they enjoy the outdoors and wouldn’t want to be cooped up in an office or on their couch on computers. I bet quite a few don’t even use computers!

Also, keep in mind without ruffnecks, lumberjacks, and iron workers, American industry would come to a screeching halt!! You would also not be able to get around (no bridges) large cities would be gone! No skyscrapers, no oil (so most people wouldn’t even have heat or gasoline) no wood, so you can’t fix your house… Hell, you won’t even have anymore paper! And without roofers your ass would get wet fast! If you live in the city and all the taxicab drivers quit, because you just told them all their jobs suck, I hope you have a good set of walking shoes!

Instead of wasting your time writing bullshit articles about how these jobs suck and how computer jobs, and less labor intensive jobs are so much better, how about figuring out how we can improve the way of life and working conditions of those, so called worst jobs in America, because they are an
important and integral part to the fabric of life in America!

The fact that we actually paid someone to do an annual report, to tell us that those working conditions are bad and they are the worst jobs in America (when all anyone has to do is watch dirty jobs on tv) is the worst part of this entire thing!

How about that being the best job in America!! Working for the Government, doing nothing but useless paperwork and Getting paid big money (probably gs-15) to tell us what we already know!

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12 responses

  1. alfonso

    Hi! Do you use Twitter? I’d like to follow you if that would be okay. I’m absolutely enjoying your blog and look
    forward to new updates.

    December 21, 2012 at 9:13 PM

  2. Daisy

    Sweet blog! I found it while surfing around on Yahoo News.
    Do you have any suggestions on how to get listed in Yahoo News?
    I’ve been trying for a while but I never seem to get there! Appreciate it

    December 22, 2012 at 11:02 PM

  3. The article is a scam and does not come from MSNBC, but rather from a scam site that illegally uses their logo,etc.

    January 4, 2013 at 2:09 PM

    • i checked the source its msnbc.com i wasn’t redirected

      January 7, 2013 at 12:45 PM

  4. What is the source URL? I’m pretty sure it’s going to be something like msnbcf.oo18.xx or something, not really msnbc.com. MSNBC has put out a similar article, but without the online affiliate stuff.

    January 7, 2013 at 12:52 PM

  5. The domain there is com-52.us, not msnbc.com

    January 7, 2013 at 1:40 PM

    • thats where I found it just now originally I was on msn homepage in hotmail

      January 7, 2013 at 1:45 PM

    • I actually read both I think, but copied the spoof. When I went back… nice catch, but my comments still stand! roofer, roughneck etc are critical infrastructure jobs, we know they suck! we don’t need anyone to get paid to tell us they suck! Without them and people willing to do them American Society will crumble!! Instead of wasting money and time on putting boards together to tell us what we know already sucks! spend that money on process improvement and better working conditions for those positions and preserve our way of life. Also like I said most of the people that take those jobs don’t want to be cooped up in an office building to be a software engineer and vice versa! SO to them you can’t say what’s the best and worst job in America.

      January 7, 2013 at 2:18 PM

  6. JMan

    Agree. I suspect Robert Hill is a paid blogger promoting that home cash success stuff. I called them, after being jerked around multiple times, they wanted over $9,000 to invest in an Ebay drop and ship business. when I said no, they got insulting towards me. No way should this have been linked to as a #1 job. I am unable to leave a post on this article or find a way to contact the author. I call bs and I think msnbc has been ‘had’, no one fact checked any of this. All too common with today’s online writers.

    February 19, 2013 at 3:31 PM

    • It was actually a malicious redirect pointed out by another reader

      February 19, 2013 at 8:25 PM

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